Various organic, natural and inert soil amendments.

Purpose

Soil structure
The most common use of soil conditioners is to improve soil structure. Soils tend to become compacted over time. Soil compaction impedes root growth, decreasing the ability of plants to take up nutrients and water. Soil conditioners can add more loft and texture to keep the soil loose.

Soil nutrients
For centuries people have been adding things to poor soils to improve their ability to support healthy plant growth. Some of these materials, such as compost, clay and peat, are still used extensively today. Many soil amendments also add nutrients such as carbon and nitrogen, as well as beneficial bacteria. Additional nutrients, such as calcium, magnesium and phosphorus, may be augmented by amendments as well. This enriches the soil, allowing plants to grow bigger and stronger.

Cation exchange
Soil amendments can also greatly increase the cation exchange capacity of soils. Soils act as the storehouses of plant nutrients. The relative ability of soils to store one particular group of nutrients, the cations, is referred to as cation exchange capacity or CEC. The most common soil cations are: calcium, magnesium, potassium, ammonium, hydrogen, and sodium. The total number of cations a soil can hold, its total negative charge, is the soil’s cation exchange capacity. The higher the CEC, the higher the negative charge and the more cations that can be held and exchanged with plant roots, providing them with the nutrition they require.

Water retention
Soil conditioners may be used to improve water retention in dry, coarse soils which are not holding water well. The addition of organic material for instance can greatly improve the water retention abilities of sandy soils and they can be added to adjust the pH of the soil to meet the needs of specific plants or to make highly acidic or alkaline soils more usable.[9] The possibility of using other materials to assume the role of composts and clays in improving the soil was investigated on a scientific basis earlier in the 20th century, and the term soil conditioning was coined. The criteria by which such materials are judged most often remains their cost effectiveness, their ability to increase soil moisture for longer periods, stimulate microbiological activity, increase nutrient levels and improve plant survival rates. The first synthetic soil conditioners were introduced in the 1950s, when the chemical hydrolysed polyacrylonitrile was the most used. Because of their ability to absorb several hundred times their own weight in water, polyacrylamides and polymethacrylates (also known as hydroabsorbent polymers, superabsorbent polymers or hydrogels) were tested in agriculture, horticulture and landscaping beginning in the 1960s. Interest disappeared when experiments proved them to be phytotoxic due to their high acrylamide monomer residue. Although manufacturing advances later brought the monomer concentration down below the toxic level, scientific literature shows few successes in utilizing these polymers for increasing plant quality or survival. The appearance of a new generation of potentially effective tools in the early 1980s, including hydroabsorbent polymers and copolymers from the propenamide and propenamide-propenoate families opened new perspectives.

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Alfalfa/Lucerne Mulch

R80.00R225.00
Primary benefit of this pleasant smelling mulch is increasing organic matter, although it is also a valuable plant-derived fertiliser. Has a minimum of 15% protein, which is the equivalent of 2.4% Nitrogen. Also contains trace minerals and triaconatol (a natural growth hormone). Excellent addition to the compost pile for nitrogen content and absorbency. Roses respond especially well to alfalfa mulch. Spread a layer about 2cm thick in spring and in the middle of summer.

Aloe Meal

R140.00R1,100.00
1L = Approx. 340g Organically grown Contains various beneficial natural compounds such as mannans, polysaccharides, lectins, and anthraquinones 18 amino acids Excellent water hydration properties

Calcitic Lime

R20.00R170.00
Calcitic lime is manufactured from finely crushed (1mm) limestone – a natural source of calcium carbonate that typically exhibits a calcium content of between 33 and 35 percent, it is produced from limestone with a high purity level.

Elemental Blend Amendment Pack

R230.00R600.00
ORGASOILUX Mineral & Nutrient Pack  

Fulvic Acid Flakes

R100.00R1,250.00
1L = Approx. 550g Apply 1g per 1 litre of water to use as a foliar spray or soil drench once every 2 weeks.  

Gypsum

R20.00R275.00
Natural Gypsum 10L = Approx. 11kg Gypsum or Calcium Sulphate Dihydrate (CaSO4.2H20) is Nature’s very own plant super food. It increases and maintains plant health by providing them with large amounts of soluble Calcium and Sulphur: two elements essential to plant growth. Gypsum is extracted from an open-air mine in Yzerfontein using recycled water only. Here are its features: Soluble calcium helps overcome the dispersion effects of magnesium or sodium ions, enhancing soil aggregation and porosity to improve aeration and water infiltration Agricultural standards require gypsum of only natural sources to be used on plants and with current purity levels of 85%; our gypsum is literally the best there is.

Humic Acid Powder

R90.00R750.00
Humic acid powder is extracted from highly active organic Leonardite, making it one of the most effective and profitable soil conditioners on the market. Globally, precious soil carbon has been depleted from our soils, leaving farmers without these essential and necessary components which enables them to be sustainable and profitable for generations to come. Humates have the highest organic carbon levels of any natural product. Humic acid is known for its effective promotion of beneficial soil fungi (including mycorrhiza) which creates a desirable crumb structure in the soil.

Kelp Meal

R100.00R1,200.00
APPLICATION Kelp meal can be used dry if the soil is watered immediately after application, but works best when pre-hydrated (swollen in water) prior to mixing into the top 10-15cms of soil. Add dry kelp meal to the recommended volume of water. Allow to hydrate for 6-8 hours in a shaded place or overnight and then mix evenly into the soil prior to planting. When watering intervals do not exceed 7 days, use 1% Kelp meal. In very arid, sandy soils or when watering exceeds 7 days, use 2% kelp meal.

Micronised Calcitic Lime

R90.00R410.00
Micro Calcium A raw calcitic lime micronized to a 2 micron particle size. The ultra fine grade allows it to

Micronised Gypsum

R90.00R410.00
Micronised Gypsum A raw gypsum micronized to a 200 micron particle size. The fine grade allows it to easily fall into suspension when mixed with water. Uses To add calcium and sulphur as a supplement or where a deficiency has been observed. Directions for use Use once a week at 2.5 – 5ml per litre of water to supplement calcium and sulphur. To fix sulphur deficiencies use 5ml per litre of water and adjust pH with a fermented/acidic product such as the Cannabis Microbial Consortium or Micro Calcium. Apply twice a week until deficiency has been rectified. Be sure to keep the water moving/agitated during application to ensure the product remains evenly mixed. Analysis Calcium CaO – 34.27% Sulphur SO3 – 56.52% pH < 5  

Perlite

R25.00R480.00
Horticultural perlite is an easy to use, lightweight, sterile soil conditioner that provides a number of important benefits to commercial growers, landscapers and home gardeners. A primary benefit is the ability of  horticultural perlite to improve aeration and drainage of excess water. Perlite exhibits a unique moisture exchange property whereby optimum amounts of water and water-soluble nutrients are maintained for use by plants as required. It is inorganic, does not decompose or break down, and has an almost neutral pH range of 6.5 to 7.5. It also serves as an insulator by reducing extreme soil temperature fluctuations which can be detrimental to good root development and vigorous growth. Perlite can be used to advantage in almost every horticultural application.